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C

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by scott s - Friday, August 29, 2008, 04:44 PM
 

The degree of individual and collective commitment introduces a quite distinctive quality. Border Studies is an environment congenial to highly self-motivated individuals and it encourages the redefinition of such commitment. There is a collective appreciation of the risks and sacrifices associated with the work as well as the possible benefits.

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by scott s - Friday, August 29, 2008, 04:46 PM
 

Much of the work responds to contradictions in the psycho-social system and in the efforts to improve it. Any creative response implies the possibility of some emergent synthesis which would transcend such limitations rather than simply favoring a particular model or method. It is suspected that the nature of the synthesis is such that its paradoxical quality cannot be completely embodied in simple forms. Emphasis is therefore given to indirect approaches. Configurations of competing forms, or patterns of resonance between alternative modes, are explored as ways of expressing the dynamics of subtler levels of synthesis in a manner significant for psycho-social design.

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by scott s - Friday, August 29, 2008, 04:45 PM
 

In envisaging research and designing action strategies, special attention is given to the need for constraints, limits or self-discipline. Constraints, including death itself, are seen as a vital means of giving form to freedom. They are not simply regretted and eliminated as unwelcome impositions, but are viewed as a creative challenge which helps to structure any psycho-social design and to articulate its unique quality.

Picture of scott s
by scott s - Friday, August 29, 2008, 04:43 PM
 

Effort is directed toward complementing conventional “positive” approaches by cultivating a more creative understanding of “negative” approaches. In the same spirit, careful attention is given to any domain which is neglected or considered irrelevant. Deliberate attempts are made to “rehabilitate” the significance of whatever has been rejected in this way. This attitude extends to hidden assumptions and the ugly realities of the enterprise itself viewed as constituting its own “shadow”.